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Weekend Inspiration

April 29, 2012

I haven’t said very much about my new job on my blog. There are several reasons for this. Most importantly, the work that I do is confidential. I feel privileged to have patients talk to me openly about their experiences and the issues they face, to let me conduct assessments which test the very things that are difficult for them, and to let me see the way their conditions impact their lives. And I would never share any of this on the blog. In fact, I don’t think it would be appropriate for me to share any part of anyone’s story, even if I kept every part of their identity confidential. And even if I was allowed to share their stories, I could never do them justice.

In my new job, I work primarily with people who have severe epilepsy. I also work one day per week on a stroke ward. Both of these conditions can be extremely difficult to live with, and they are both causes which have become far more important to me in the past couple of months. However, having known very little about epilepsy previously, this is definitely the condition which I have learned the most about, and which is frequently on my mind at the moment.

Therefore, I couldn’t help wanting to share this article which I came across earlier in the week.

Epileptic runner finishes London Marathon six-and-a-half hours (despite having TWENTY fits on route)

Image Source

I think that epilepsy is often mis-understood. I know that I previously had no idea what it was like for someone to have epilepsy. And I am aware that I still don’t really have any idea. But I have been lucky enough to gain a huge amount of insight from people who live with this devastating condition every single day. These people are incredibly brave just to go grocery shopping or take a bus into town. This woman ran a marathon. Wow.

Please take a minute to read the story here.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. April 30, 2012 5:27 pm

    I was a patient with severe epilepsy. That led to neurosurgery to help ease my condition. This surgery led to a stroke. I know some of the bad and a lot of the good you will see. Please, know my gratitude for all you are doing to help others that struggle with conditions that are often misunderstood.

    • June 5, 2012 6:53 pm

      Hi Tara,

      Thank you so much for your comments. I have just had a look at your blog and it is incredibly uplifting and inspirational. I feel very lucky to be able to work with people who have similar stories to yours – and to be able to do even a tiny bit to help. I am inspired every single day, and I am looking forward to seeing more of your blog. Thank you for getting in touch!

      ~Emily~

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